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Kings Peak, UT - The long route

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Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby mtn_nut » Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:45 pm

TrailGroove just published my article on my Highline trip this summer and bagging Kings Peak.

http://www.trailgroove.com/issue11.html?autoflip=31

Enjoy, and let me know what you think

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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby Kolo » Fri Nov 15, 2013 8:47 am

Enjoyed your article, thanks for sharing! I summited Kings Peak two summers ago and it was one the most fun scrambles I have ever done. I hope to return to do a more extended backpacking trip like the one you wrote about. I think you really captured the essence of the area in your writing.

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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby Scott P » Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:06 am

Cool. You guys really hiked that fast! Here are a few comments you may be interested in:

1. Pigeon Milk Springs actually taste wonderful. The reason it is called that is because the water has a slightly milky color due due a very small amount of glacial dust still seeping out. Still, it taste really good. Why pigeon milk, I don't know. Pigeons don't even have mammary glands. I have drank out of the spring many times and it is one of the best sources around since it comes directly out of the rocks.

2. You were right about the detour around Lightning Lake as being much more scenic than the direct route down to Rock Creek. It's also easier as well. Too bad you missed it since it is one of the most beautiful areas along the route. Maybe next time.

Since the trip report is a published article, here are some very minor corrections:

1. Most of the Uintas are actually made of Quartzite rather than shale. Some shale is present, but the majority of the rock you are seeing is actually quartzite which has retained much of its horizontal bedding.

2. What you call “North Pole Pass” is usually known as Pole Line Pass, but possibly some sources call it North Pole? I think I’ve heard it once before as North Pole before your report?

3. The elevation for Kings Peak is off. The USGS maps label it as 13,528, but this has been corrected to 13,534. I’ve never seen the elevation of over 13,627 in the report.

4. It’s actually Hayden Pass (named after the famous geologist) rather than Haden Pass.

Great report. I have many memories of the place and have spent literally hundreds of days in those mountains, but don't make it out there much anymore. Your photos are really nice and brought back some good memories.
I'm slow and fat. Unfortunately, those are my good qualities.

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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby steelfrog » Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:35 am

So I just spent all morning looking at all 11 issues, and printing ones I like from the .pdf versions of the magazine.

I like it a lot and it has improved markedly from issue 1 to 11.

One suggestion--the articles are inconsistent on this point, but I like labels for the pictures telling us what they are--what lake, etc..

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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby mtn_nut » Fri Nov 15, 2013 11:33 am

Scott P wrote:Cool. You guys really hiked that fast! Here are a few comments you may be interested in:

1. Pigeon Milk Springs actually taste wonderful. The reason it is called that is because the water has a slightly milky color due due a very small amount of glacial dust still seeping out. Still, it taste really good. Why pigeon milk, I don't know. Pigeons don't even have mammary glands. I have drank out of the spring many times and it is one of the best sources around since it comes directly out of the rocks.

2. You were right about the detour around Lightning Lake as being much more scenic than the direct route down to Rock Creek. It's also easier as well. Too bad you missed it since it is one of the most beautiful areas along the route. Maybe next time.

Since the trip report is a published article, here are some very minor corrections:

1. Most of the Uintas are actually made of Quartzite rather than shale. Some shale is present, but the majority of the rock you are seeing is actually quartzite which has retained much of its horizontal bedding.

2. What you call “North Pole Pass” is usually known as Pole Line Pass, but possibly some sources call it North Pole? I think I’ve heard it once before as North Pole before your report?

3. The elevation for Kings Peak is off. The USGS maps label it as 13,528, but this has been corrected to 13,534. I’ve never seen the elevation of over 13,627 in the report.

4. It’s actually Hayden Pass (named after the famous geologist) rather than Haden Pass.

Great report. I have many memories of the place and have spent literally hundreds of days in those mountains, but don't make it out there much anymore. Your photos are really nice and brought back some good memories.


Thanks for the fact checking.

I wasn't saying that it wasn't a good spring. i was just thrown back by the name so much that i thought it was a fun to talk about, and lead into how the water everywhere is great. considering its coming out of a mountain side at nearly 11k, i can't imagine it being fouled.

I felt like an idiot after getting over rock creek, which is why i recommended trying the alternate route. Thanks for confirming my suspicions.

I'll have to do some more fact checking into the geology. Thanks for the insight.

All of the maps I've seen call it north pole pass, so that is what I'm basing it off of. if you want to check out the TI map i was using, you can preview it here - http://www.natgeomaps.com/ti_711

I will have them change the elevation and the pass name. i can't believe i missed those, especially the elevation. I must have typed it in wrong


steelfrog wrote:So I just spent all morning looking at all 11 issues, and printing ones I like from the .pdf versions of the magazine.

I like it a lot and it has improved markedly from issue 1 to 11.

One suggestion--the articles are inconsistent on this point, but I like labels for the pictures telling us what they are--what lake, etc..


I've talked with editor about this, and i think maybe a few of them could use captions. I appreciate the feedback though :-)

-Ted

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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby Scott P » Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:10 pm

if you want to check out the TI map i was using


Now that you mention it, that's where I saw the name. I'm not sure if it is an error or alternate name. Since it is on the TI map and un-named on the USGS maps, North Pole will probably be the more common used name as time goes on. All of the old guidebooks always refer to it as Pole Line Pass.
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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby mtn_nut » Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:15 pm

Scott P wrote:
if you want to check out the TI map i was using


Now that you mention it, that's where I saw the name. I'm not sure if it is an error or alternate name. Since it is on the TI map and un-named on the USGS maps, North Pole will probably be the more common used name as time goes on. All of the old guidebooks always refer to it as Pole Line Pass.


its not even located correctly on the TI map

Caltopo also has it labeled as north pole pass, and has it correctly located.

http://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=40.79365,-110.09302&z=14&b=t

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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby Scott P » Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:29 pm

its not even located correctly on the TI map


Weird. Perhaps even weirder is the fact that it's even considered a pass at all, regardless of the name. It's more of the trail highpoint on the side of the mountain.

Thanks for the link.
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Re: Kings Peak, UT - The long route

Postby mtn_nut » Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:38 pm

Scott P wrote:
its not even located correctly on the TI map


Weird. Perhaps even weirder is the fact that it's even considered a pass at all, regardless of the name. It's more of the trail highpoint on the side of the mountain.

Thanks for the link.


I agree, but when you get up there on top of north pole pass, it makes sense why they used it as a path. It looked like it might have also been used as an ORV road to get to fox lake.

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