Forum
Buying gear? Please use these links to help 14ers.com:

More info...

Other ways to help...

Climbing Utah

14ers in California and Washington state or any other peak in the USA
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:18 am

Climbing Utah

Postby danny bray » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:10 pm

My son just started college in the Salt Lake City area and I couldn't help but notice the peaks just to the east of the city. Has anybody ever climbed these and have any info on trailheads, etc.

User avatar
Posts: 5040
Joined: Wed May 04, 2005 11:46 am
Location: Craig

Postby Scott P » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:16 pm

My son just started college in the Salt Lake City area and I couldn't help but notice the peaks just to the east of the city. Has anybody ever climbed these and have any info on trailheads, etc.


Yes, I've climbed dozens and dozens of them. For starters, check all the attachments to the below pages:

http://www.summitpost.org/area/range/17 ... south.html

http://www.summitpost.org/area/range/17 ... ntral.html

http://www.summitpost.org/area/range/17 ... north.html

You are in luck, because Salt Lake City has dozens of peaks within easy walking or biking distance, or in a few minutes by car.

Use extreme caution in winter though. The Wasatch are probably one of the top 3 avalanche prone ranges in the country and can be very dangerous in winter. Still, many lower peaks can be done safely.

User avatar
Posts: 704
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2005 8:24 pm
Location: Brighton, CO

Postby Layne Bracy » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:37 pm

I did a fun scramble this summer on the ridge south of Little Cottonwood Canyon: Bullion Divide trip report

I have an excel file for all the peaks(either named or with 280'+ rise) in Salt Lake County. It's at home, but I can send it to you later tonight. Some of the peaks are low enough that avalanches shouldn't be an issue even in winter.

Summitpost is a great place for him to get more specific info.

User avatar
Posts: 1293
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 1:18 pm
Location: Lower Highlands/Denver, CO USA

Postby Rockymtnhigh69 » Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:09 pm

I have never climbed in the Wasatch, but I have sure skied the hell out of em.. I would echo Scott's appraisal for winter climbing.. The Wasatch are an incredibly dangerous place for avalanche danger.. One of the worst in the country especially in and around big and little cottonwood canyons..
BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL...

The Uinta's in Utah will also have some great climbing opportunties IMO.
Tell your son he is lucky to have that playground is his backyard.. Better yet he isnt all that far from Moab and the La Sals as well.. =D>
On my first take-off, I hit second gear and went through the speed limit on a two-lane blacktop highway full of ranch traffic. By the time I went up to third, I was going 75 and the tach was barely above 4000 rpm....
And that's when the Ducati got its second wind. From 4000 to 6000 in third will take you from 75 mph to 95 in two seconds - and after that, Bubba, you still have fourth, fifth, and sixth. Ho, ho.

~Hunter S. Thompson, Song of the Sausage Creature

(VT)

Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:18 am

Postby danny bray » Tue Oct 31, 2006 9:57 pm

Thanks for the replies. That will be useful info.From my son's apartment there are two peaks to the east that look particularly inviting. It's funny how after you start climbing mountains how they attract your attention and you ask yourself "can I climb that one." Before you started climbing you would have noticed them and just thought it was scenic looking and that's it.

User avatar
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:43 am
Location: Layton, Utah

Postby Wasatch » Wed Nov 01, 2006 8:42 am

I enjoy the Wasatch Range.

User avatar
Posts: 1293
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 1:18 pm
Location: Lower Highlands/Denver, CO USA

Postby Rockymtnhigh69 » Wed Nov 01, 2006 12:04 pm

Wasatch wrote:I enjoy the Wasatch Range.


Yeah, that is not a very hard thing to do.. Life is definitely rough for you.. :lol:
On my first take-off, I hit second gear and went through the speed limit on a two-lane blacktop highway full of ranch traffic. By the time I went up to third, I was going 75 and the tach was barely above 4000 rpm....
And that's when the Ducati got its second wind. From 4000 to 6000 in third will take you from 75 mph to 95 in two seconds - and after that, Bubba, you still have fourth, fifth, and sixth. Ho, ho.

~Hunter S. Thompson, Song of the Sausage Creature

(VT)

User avatar
Posts: 140
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 2:01 pm
Location: Colorado Springs

Postby sudnstop » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:26 pm

Climbing or Rock and Ice did a great article on moderate alpine routes in the are you are talking about. My friends went to cottonwood over the summer with their dog and were told there was a huge fine for a dog there, even if it is in the car.. I know I am dying to climb there..
Cheers,
Greg

"I believe in God, only I spell it Nature." Frank Lloyd Wright

User avatar
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 9:43 am
Location: Layton, Utah

Postby Wasatch » Thu Nov 02, 2006 3:14 pm

As far as I know between Little/Big Cottonwood and Millcreek Canyons, only Millcreek you can have a dog along on a hike. Mountain bikes are another thing, as far as I know only the Mill D trail to Dog Lake/Desolation Lake and the ridge above to Guardsmen Pass is the only trail, bikes are allowed, even then, odd or even days only. Not sure about Millcreek Canyon, but I've never seen a bike on a trail there, only on the road.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Buckie06 and 3 guests