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Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby Skip Perkins » Tue Oct 29, 2013 4:43 pm

When I climbed Rainier I went with RMI and thought it was a valuable learning experience. All of my climbing was on rock, snow and ice scared the hell out of me. All of my other rock experience has been unguided but I am open to change. My current exercise regimen and expanding waistline have hindered my mountaineering goals. Thus; I will consider paying someone to short-rope my old, out-of-shape ass up the Bells & Wilson-ELD. After that I can start to pursue the waterfalls and hot springs in Susan's books. I do have to be honest and say that I occasionally get a WSJ but I only look at the pictures.
Perseverance - The courage to ignore the obvious wisdom of turning back.

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby rpdawes » Tue Oct 29, 2013 5:14 pm

Dave B.

Can you tell us what you meant by the statement, "I don't understand the desire to "conquer a mountain" for the captain of the industry types. Can't they just stick with cocaine and murdering strippers instead."? I believe that you meant CEO as the captain of the industry types. Am I wrong?

Yes, I have read all of your following threads that were a lot better, more conductive to a honest and constructive discussion except one. You said, "That is unless you see mountains as bragging rights, in which case you are an asshat." Am I an asshat since I did brag about reaching the highest mountain in Colorado as my first 14er at 73? How do you differentiate bragging rights? The term "asshat" is an indecent word to some people.

I wish that you could avoid classifying some people as "those who just stick with cocaine and murdering strippers" in the first place while writing your first thread. That is not a good way to start a constructive and thoughtful debate.

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby Dave B » Tue Oct 29, 2013 6:05 pm

The cocaine and murdering strippers comment was a joke based on a cliche of power hungry wall street types. A cliche that isn't exactly obscure and the statement was more a reference to the book "American Psycho" in which a well-to-do and privileged young wall street type turns to murdering strangers as a form of entertainment as the daily grind of finance and dinner at highfalutin restaurants don't quite bring him the fulfillment he desires. I don't think it's much of a stretch to tie this lack of morality for the sake of entertainment with the bastardization of mountaineering for entertainment.

I don't think that's what bankers/CEOs/execs/whatever all murder strippers and do cocaine but it's a prevalent cliche and thus, funny (to me at least).
"There is no cheating in climbing, only lying." - Semi-Rad

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby smoove » Tue Oct 29, 2013 6:18 pm

Dave B wrote:The cocaine and murdering strippers comment was a joke based on a cliche of power hungry wall street types. A cliche that isn't exactly obscure and the statement was more a reference to the book "American Psycho" in which a well-to-do and privileged young wall street type turns to murdering strangers as a form of entertainment as the daily grind of finance and dinner at highfalutin restaurants don't quite bring him the fulfillment he desires. I don't think it's much of a stretch to tie this lack of morality for the sake of entertainment with the bastardization of mountaineering for entertainment.

I don't think that's what bankers/CEOs/execs/whatever all murder strippers and do cocaine but it's a prevalent cliche and thus, funny (to me at least).


Hilarious movie. It was an obvious joke and I'm glad you didn't resort to the pink font.

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby highpilgrim » Tue Oct 29, 2013 6:48 pm

smoove wrote: It was an obvious joke and I'm glad you didn't resort to the pink font.


It's not called the idiot font for nuthin.

Only necessary if your target audience is an...
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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby susanjoypaul » Wed Oct 30, 2013 11:36 am

Skip Perkins wrote:Thus; I will consider paying someone to short-rope my old, out-of-shape ass up the Bells & Wilson-ELD. After that I can start to pursue the waterfalls and hot springs in Susan's books. I do have to be honest and say that I occasionally get a WSJ but I only look at the pictures.

That's a great idea. If you visit every one of the 150 Colorado waterfalls and 32 hot springs in those books, you'll cover more than 400 miles and climb about 75,000 feet. And you won't have to get short-roped or hire a guide!

Unless you want to climb the falls in winter, of course, in which case you might have to hire an ice climbing guide for over-50 asshats, or set up an ice climbing day with some Gumbies. Be sure to keep us in the loop on your plans, as you know how we all love a rousing thread.

See'ya out there, Skip ;-)

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby Kingbee » Wed Oct 30, 2013 12:41 pm

rpdawes wrote:Dave B.

Can you tell us what you meant by the statement, "I don't understand the desire to "conquer a mountain" for the captain of the industry types. Can't they just stick with cocaine and murdering strippers instead."? I believe that you meant CEO as the captain of the industry types. Am I wrong?

Yes, I have read all of your following threads that were a lot better, more conductive to a honest and constructive discussion except one. You said, "That is unless you see mountains as bragging rights, in which case you are an asshat." Am I an asshat since I did brag about reaching the highest mountain in Colorado as my first 14er at 73? How do you differentiate bragging rights? The term "asshat" is an indecent word to some people.

I wish that you could avoid classifying some people as "those who just stick with cocaine and murdering strippers" in the first place while writing your first thread. That is not a good way to start a constructive and thoughtful debate.


Nice post and congrats. on your Elbert achievement. As a 60 year old long time lurker and "conquerer" of a few class 1 14ers, including Elbert I thought this sounded like a promising thread to which I could add some constructive dialog. All I can say is WOW! I understand there is a purity to mountain climbing and that many are deeply offended by the notion that a mountain climbing experience shouldnt be for sale but any climb above the tree line gets
to be exponentially more difficult with age. I know I worked hard to prepare myself, I am left wondering how many of the younger highly accomplished climbers weighing in on this subject are still doing it at the age of 73.

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby 3rdGenNative » Wed Oct 30, 2013 12:42 pm

Wow, this one sure blew up overnight. My two thoughts that I'll share without bringing more contempt toward the over-50, chest-pounding, Aspenite, I'm thinking that we're going to see a lot more over-50 out of state types sporting new packs, boots, crampons and axes next summer. "I was on a guided climb two days ago. What can possibly go wrong?" as they cross a steep snowfield or are making their way to the summit by 2:00 p.m.

Also, if you're athletic and have the money,aren't Everest and other well known peaks generally attainable?
"There is more in us than we know. If we can be made to see it, perhaps, for the rest of our lives, we will never again settle for less."
Kurt Hahn-Founder of Outward Bound

"Reading about nature is fine, but if a person walks in the woods and listens carefully, he can learn more than what is in books, for they speak with the voice of God." George Washington Carver

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby GeezerClimber » Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:15 pm

Kingbee wrote:
rpdawes wrote:Dave B.

Can you tell us what you meant by the statement, "I don't understand the desire to "conquer a mountain" for the captain of the industry types. Can't they just stick with cocaine and murdering strippers instead."? I believe that you meant CEO as the captain of the industry types. Am I wrong?

Yes, I have read all of your following threads that were a lot better, more conductive to a honest and constructive discussion except one. You said, "That is unless you see mountains as bragging rights, in which case you are an asshat." Am I an asshat since I did brag about reaching the highest mountain in Colorado as my first 14er at 73? How do you differentiate bragging rights? The term "asshat" is an indecent word to some people.

I wish that you could avoid classifying some people as "those who just stick with cocaine and murdering strippers" in the first place while writing your first thread. That is not a good way to start a constructive and thoughtful debate.


Nice post and congrats. on your Elbert achievement. As a 60 year old long time lurker and "conquerer" of a few class 1 14ers, including Elbert I thought this sounded like a promising thread to which I could add some constructive dialog. All I can say is WOW! I understand there is a purity to mountain climbing and that many are deeply offended by the notion that a mountain climbing experience shouldnt be for sale but any climb above the tree line gets
to be exponentially more difficult with age. I know I worked hard to prepare myself, I am left wondering how many of the younger highly accomplished climbers weighing in on this subject are still doing it at the age of 73.


I can answer your question. I've been climbing for 30 years. At first, most other climbers were close to my age. Now at age 62, I'm in rarified company. I made about 40 climbs the last 4 years and I doubt I encountered more than 20 sixty somethings. A friend of mine in his late 50s used to be an avid rock climber. He's still fit and wants to continue but all the people he used to climb with are now "fat sofa spuds."

I also don't understand the anti-guide crowd here. I haven't used any for climbing (yet) but it seems to me that guiding is an honorable profession that has enabled people to experience the joy of climbing and being up high who otherwise would not. No doubt they've also saved lives. How many of us can say that?

Dave

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby Jay521 » Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:28 pm

Age is just a number. I'm climbing tougher stuff now than I did 40 years ago. Guess I was pretty much a wimp 40 years ago.. :lol:
I take the mountain climber's approach to housekeeping - don't look down

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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby SchralpTheGnar » Wed Oct 30, 2013 2:56 pm

If anyone over 50 can find a guide that'll climb with them for more than 10 minutes they should hold on to them like grim death, which is not far off by the way.


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Re: Article: Mountain Climbing for the Over 50 Set- WSJ

Postby climbing_rob » Wed Oct 30, 2013 7:40 pm

Not to be an Age Prude, but I wonder what percentage of you youngn's have come even close to climbing the number and quality of peaks, canyons, you name it that I have SINCE I turned 50. What a bunch of age snobs. Grow up. Wait, you will, we hope at least (meaning I sincerely wish you long, safe lives filled with adventure, like mine is).

Woops, forgot to mention, all but a couple climbs were unguided, of course, plus my well-over-50 wife was along on almost all of them.

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