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Native American historical locations

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Native American historical locations

Postby chrismjx » Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:33 am

I saw the recent articles about the wickiups located in RMNP and it got me wondering: What other Native American historical sites might be out there? Anyone have any interesting info or tips to share? Similar to the WWII plane crash wreckage just outside the Northern boundary of RMNP, I like long(ish) off-trail routes to awesome places like this.....

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Re: Native American historical locations

Postby schrund » Sun Jan 27, 2013 7:39 am

Of course our biggest "claim to fame" is Mesa Verde, but there are other ruins in SW Colorado/NM like the ruins at Aztec. I've hiked out in the desert around Boulder and Escalante, UT, and there are structures just sitting out in canyons to be discovered, haven't been messed with in centuries.
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Re: Native American historical locations

Postby Fisching » Sun Jan 27, 2013 11:24 am

chrismjx wrote:I saw the recent articles about the wickiups located in RMNP and it got me wondering: What other Native American historical sites might be out there? Anyone have any interesting info or tips to share? Similar to the WWII plane crash wreckage just outside the Northern boundary of RMNP, I like long(ish) off-trail routes to awesome places like this.....


While the teacher in me is disappointed that I'm resorting to linking a Wikipedia page, I must give them credit for having a great list organized by Colorado's counties of the various ancient native dwellings in the state. I cannot speak for many of these locations in regards to whether they meet you requirements; but I hope it proves to be a valuable resource in finding the best ruins to explore. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewer_Archaeological_District#Locations

One place I would recommend out of a great personal experience, its secluded location and hiking options is the Canyons of the Ancients. Plus, the name is awesome. http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/nm/canm.html

If you're willing to leave the state, I would highly recommend the NE corner of Arizona where the National Park Service has done a great job preserving numerous Native dwellings in Wupatki National Monument and Navajo National Monument. The Canyon De Chelly National Monument offers a very unique experience as the National Monument still contains a community of Navajo Indians who continuously living with it's boundaries. Be aware that the National Park Service understandably has restrictions in place for some of these locations as their main priority is to safeguard the archeological integrity of the site rather than offer hikers a backcountry experience. However, the uniqueness of NE Arizona is well worth the time and effort to explore it.

Wupatki National Monument: http://www.nps.gov/wupa/index.htm
Navajo National Monument:http://www.nps.gov/nava/index.htm
Canyon De Chelly National Monument: http://www.nps.gov/cach/index.htm
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Re: Native American historical locations

Postby Scott P » Sun Jan 27, 2013 3:43 pm

What other Native American historical sites might be out there?


Do mean in Rocky Mountain NP area, or Colorado in general?

If you mean Colorado in general, than western Colorado is full of things like cliff dwellings, petroglyphs and pictographs. Eastern Colorado has them too, but they aren't as numerous it seems, at least when it comes to cliff dwellings (petroglyphs and pictographs exist statewide). Wikiups, like those used on the plains don't last as long as cliff dwellings.

Some of the best sites in Colorado outside Mesa Verde are Sand Canyon, Rock Canyon, McElmo Creek, Cross Canyon, all over Dinosaur National Monument (especially Echo Park and the side canyons of the Yampa), etc. Canyon Pintado has some pretty good sites, but not quite as the previous ones mentioned.

Often my favorite sites are the ones that are unknown rather than known and that you just stumble upon without expecting them.

There were ancient carved footprints along a very remote route I stumbled upon in the Colorado side of Dinosaur National Monument.

Image

They appeared under overhangs sporadically along a route I was scouting out, so I assume that they were there to mark some kind of ancient walking route. Since several of them were covered with desert varnish, they were at least several hundred years old, and perhaps over 1000 years old.
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Re: Native American historical locations

Postby ChrisRoberts » Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:51 pm

Can I get a link to that article about the RMNP wikiups? I never saw anything
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Re: Native American historical locations

Postby Fisching » Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:37 am

ChrisRoberts wrote:Can I get a link to that article about the RMNP wikiups? I never saw anything


Chris, I'm not quite sure what you're looking for, but here are a few links that contain a little info on wickiups in RMNP.
Page 146: http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/romo/mcbeth/oral_history.pdf
http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/romo/ethnography/brett.pdf
Peter Aitchison on the risks of rock climbing and mountaineering: "That's life, isn't it? We think the challenge and satisfaction you get from doing this is worth the risks."

"Respect the mountain. Train hard. Hope you can sneak up when it isn't looking."

"The mind is always worried about consequences, but the heart knows no fear. The heart just does what it wants."

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