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A strange sensation...

Postby davebks » Tue Sep 25, 2012 1:44 pm

Ok, I will admit I feel a little guilty about this. It's not something that I can control but it's there and I was curious if others get the same feeling.
I read everything I could get my hands on about the avalanche this week. It's so tragic it's hard to fathom. When I was a kid I read the books about terrible accidents, and amazing heroic survival stories, now you read them online and can get a first hand account in minutes. I know people are fascinated when something happens, especially those in the community. I use fascinated loosely because as I read the stories about Manaslu I felt like throwing up. I have been on some big peaks and I know that feeling of chance looming over you constantly.

The problem and where this post comes from is that as I read about this accident part of me wants to go there (the big mountains) and climb again as soon as possible. Is that weird??
They say, ""War is delightful to those who have not yet experienced it." -Erasmus" and I think that is true. Then there are those few who go back for more even after having experienced that sensation. There are countless books and movies about Marines who keep signing up for tours even after the horrific events they witnessed on the last tour. Not that I can relate this to a Marine in a combat zone but it's the general idea.
I read all the posts about the parties trying to decide whether or not to continue despite this tragedy. Of course they have to deal with the reality of seeing camp 2 and 3 first hand and the disaster it left behind so I can't imagine what is going through their minds.

I will never ever ever forget seeing a Korean climber's body being flown out in Nepal the day before we were headed to our basecamp. I fought long and hard with that experience but you bury it learn from it I suppose and continue on your trip.

In any case, I could go on all day about climbing. The psychology behind it all is amazing really, but you probably know that since you are on this site.

Did anyone else feel that pull to go help? to climb again? to even go to Manaslu next season??

Side note, I hope I don't offend anyone with this post. The events that occurred up there are, well...tragic, but we all know that is a possibility when climbing. I wish the best for all the families and friends involved and of course hope that those who lost their lives are in a peaceful place now. Both on that peak and every other in the world.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby I Man » Tue Sep 25, 2012 1:55 pm

ha.

You should read some of my correspondence with my closer friends about climbing - I frequently ask if I am mentally ill.

No - you are not alone. With regards to having been there, understood, and still going back - it is an interesting phenomenon. All I could think of high on Rainier was getting off of Rainier, surviving, seeing my loved ones....though once fed and rested, my partners and I were already scheming to go bigger, and soon.

Do we enjoy "Getting into trouble" or do we enjoy thriving in trying situations (thanks DSwink!)? There is no simple answer and I struggle to understand myself.

At the end of the day its what I live for....for whatever reason - we are willing to give up a lifetime of happiness and memories for these few, intense, unbelievable moments.

P.S. We are looking for partners for some International climbs next \:D/ summer
You can touch the void, just don't fall into it.

"I fly a starship across the universe divide....and when I reach the other side...I'll find a place to rest my spirit if I can. Perhaps I may become a Mountain Man again.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby edhaman » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:39 pm

You've reminded me of a quote from Martin Sheen's character in "Apolcalypse Now": "When I was in the jungle, all I could think about was getting back home. When I got home, all I could think about was getting back to the jungle." I'm not planning to go to the Himalaya, but sometimes that's how I feel about the mountains.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby DaveSwink » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:49 pm

edhaman wrote:You've reminded me of a quote from Martin Sheen's character in "Apolcalypse Now"


Reading this, I got a flash mental image of I man surfacing in a pool of water.

apocalypse now.JPG
apocalypse now.JPG (8.83 KiB) Viewed 957 times


Scary.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby edhaman » Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:44 pm

I love the smell of marmots in the morning.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby TallGrass » Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:27 pm

"When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us."
and
"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing."
from Helen Keller
Not sure if I'll do more 14ers. The trip reports are too tiring. :wink:

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby Michael J » Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:44 pm

davebks wrote:They say, ""War is delightful to those who have not yet experienced it." -Erasmus" and I think that is true. Then there are those few who go back for more even after having experienced that sensation. There are countless books and movies about Marines who keep signing up for tours even after the horrific events they witnessed on the last tour. Not that I can relate this to a Marine in a combat zone but it's the general idea.


I couldn't help but think of the guy in "The Deer Hunter" that had to keep going back for more.

"I've often heard a voice call down to me
If you'd climb higher you'd find wondrous things to see..."

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby Scott P » Wed Sep 26, 2012 7:33 am

The problem and where this post comes from is that as I read about this accident part of me wants to go there (the big mountains) and climb again as soon as possible. Is that weird??


Weird or not, it’s common, maybe even normal.

One of my friends, Mike Kelsey (a rather controversial fellow), writes guidebooks for a living. He told me that every time an accident/rescue happens in a location that is in his guidebooks (and sometimes even if they weren't using that book), sales for the books go up.

Bluejohn Canyon is a good example. Before A Ralston cut his arm off in there, the canyon was relatively obscure. After the accident, visitation skyrocketed. It wasn’t gradual either, but was immediate.

The same could be said for books like Into Thin Air. Rather than discourage visitation, they seem to have the opposite effect, even with the stern warnings/lessons.
I'm slow and fat. Unfortunately, those are my good qualities.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby edhaman » Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:44 am

Reading "Into Thin Air," made me decide that I don't want to try Everest, but it also inspired me to climb my first 14er.

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby davebks » Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:57 am

Yeah, it is a weird phenomenon. I suppose I could say that money might be saving my life right now. If I had more of it I wouldn't be in my safe office but somewhere climbing instead.
In the end maybe that's what makes you appreciate those rare moments even more.
It was funny was Iman said, that when he was on the peak all he wanted was off, but then you clear your head and bam, you want it again. that totally happens too.
](*,)

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby RyanSchilling » Wed Sep 26, 2012 9:27 am

Scott P wrote:
The problem and where this post comes from is that as I read about this accident part of me wants to go there (the big mountains) and climb again as soon as possible. Is that weird??


Weird or not, it’s common, maybe even normal.

One of my friends, Mike Kelsey (a rather controversial fellow), writes guidebooks for a living. He told me that every time an accident/rescue happens in a location that is in his guidebooks (and sometimes even if they weren't using that book), sales for the books go up.

Bluejohn Canyon is a good example. Before A Ralston cut his arm off in there, the canyon was relatively obscure. After the accident, visitation skyrocketed. It wasn’t gradual either, but was immediate.

The same could be said for books like Into Thin Air. Rather than discourage visitation, they seem to have the opposite effect, even with the stern warnings/lessons.


I'm familiar with Kelsey's books, but haven't run into any controversy surrounding him (or his books). What's the controversy about?

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Re: A strange sensation...

Postby davebks » Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:09 am

interesting first hand account of the Manaslu accident
http://www.greghill.ca/pages/disaster-strikes-on-manaslu/

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