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 Peak(s):  Mt. Democrat  -  14,148 feet
Mt. Bross  -  14,172 feet
Mt. Cameron  -  14,238 feet
Mt. Lincoln  -  14,286 feet
 Post Date:  06/25/2012 Modified: 07/15/2012
 Date Climbed:   06/23/2012
 Posted By:  docfrance

 International Assault on DeCaLiBro       

Our very ambitious climb of the DeCaLiBro group began with an 0400 rendezvous outside of my house in COS where we all car-pooled up and began the drive to Kite Lake. I led the caravan of seven vehicles and we met one other car there, arriving at about 0615 to a nearly full parking lot. Our group was made up of faculty and friends from four academic departments at the US Air Force Academy, as well as a nine international cadets who were in town for orientation prior to reporting to USAFA to begin their Basic Training and four-year journey on Thursday, 28 June. I am hosting two of those cadets (Rwanda and Senegal) and thought that a massive climb with several of them would be a great acclimatizing and spirit building event for them on a free day. So, the group all assembled at the trailhead for our “before” picture and the mob started hiking at 0635Image
There’s not much to say about the clockwise DeCaLiBro Loop that hasn’t been covered, so I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves. The climb up Democrat reminded me of an Alaska license plate (Klondike Gold Rush Scene) because there were so many people hiking. All were very friendly, though, and we enjoyed meeting an interacting with them at several points along the way, as they were curious about our very diverse group. We had several other flatlanders there to do either their first 14er or to reconnect with the mountains, so the paces varied. I stayed back as sheepdog for the group and got our trailing group to the summit in just under two hours on a perfect day. Our more ambitious cadets made it up in about 1:15 and waited for us.
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Once on the summit, we pulled out flags for each of our cadets and took a great shot of them. We also had a Canadian cadet from their Royal Military College and my nephew held the American Flag. I hope all of you know the flags being displayed. I’ll add a key at the end.
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A few in the group peeled off after Democrat returned home to COS, while the remainder of the group headed down to the saddle and over to Cameron. Again, I followed for most of this, taking pictures and keeping the groups in site. The plan was for all to meet up again atop Lincoln.
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The picture above shows our group on Cameron. A few decided to go directly to Bross from here and meet us at that summit for the descent, while my awesome daughter-in-law (mother of my grandson—future 14er climber extraordinaire) led others to Lincoln far ahead of us (below).
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The Lincoln climb was uneventful, except for the standard winds on the ridge crests—especially bad on top of Cameron. The winds were lighter on the spike of Lincoln, though, and many climbers were relaxing there, enjoying the view and the jump-roping.
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We left Lincoln and rejoined some of our compatriots at the intersection below Cameron to head over to Bross. On the way, our cadet from Kazakhstan became altitude sick and we all gathered a small distance from the Bross summit to assess the situation. He’d thrown up a few times and was quite pale. We loaded him with fluids and picked five of our strongest—and most experienced among the ‘Mercans—to cut straight down to the Bross scree trail and get him down quickly. The rest of us went to the Bross summit to gather our remaining hikers and head down quickly to join our group of six.
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The remaining trip down was without incident except for a few more puking stops and rehydrations. The footing was lousy most of the way, and those of us with poles and microspikes shared our equipment with the others. Our Kazakh friend got better as we went, but not completely. He slept the whole way home to COS and is doing fine now. Considering the size and composition of our group, I was reasonably happy that this was our only incident.
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All in all, a great trip that the cadets really enjoyed. They loved showing all of the pictures to their friends and family back home via Facebook and I’ve got a new entourage of climbers ready and willing to conquer more summits—after they successfully finish Basic Training, that is! Here’s a toast to the (incoming) Class of 2016! Welcome to the Long Blue Line—and 14ers.com!!!
Here’s a link to ALL of my photos from the trip.

(Flag key: Back Row L-R Lithuania, Kazakhstan, Rwanda Senegal, Georgia, South Korea, Canada; Front Row L-R US, Ecuador, Moldova, Gabon)



My GPS Tracks on Google Maps (made from a .GPX file upload):




Thumbnails for uploaded photos (click to open slideshow):
 


  • Comments or Questions
tmathews

Wow     2012-06-25 10:25:54
That's a lot of people! Glad you had a good time (other than the altitude sickness)!


Mooney Pilot


Bross     2012-06-25 11:32:17
I'm curious as to how you explained to nine international cadets that it's OK to climb Mt. Bross even though the summit of Mt. Bross is currently closed.


docfrance


Bross Honor Check     2012-06-25 12:09:20
Easy--I didn't know, so I didn't mention it. I saw no signs other than ”Private Property Stay On Trail.” I can give you all of our names if you'd like to file charges, though--just send me a PM and I'll send my work e-Mail address. Then you can report us to USAFA. Except, they already know because I sent them the pictures. I appreciate the conscience check, too.


rernst


Way to go     2012-06-25 12:27:09
Thats Air Force hospitality!

docfrance - nice response above! We live in a world of critics...


docfrance


Hypocrit     2012-06-25 13:54:59
And Mooney, I see that you were up there just a couple of weeks ago--and that you didn't do Lincoln and Bross because your son was waiting at the car after descending solo--and that you were solo, too.



I don't see any moral delimma about climbing Bross mentioned--and I would NEVER send a first-time 14er climber, and (in general) I'd send NO ONE down a mountain alone that I was supposed to be accompanying or was inexperienced, even on an easy one like Mt D. And you're beating me up about a non-existent sign? Really? How old is your son anyway?


Mooney Pilot


Chill     2012-06-25 14:18:54
Chill out, doc. I was just asking how you handled the situation.

There used to be a big sign saying; ”No public access to Mt. Bross, trail closed.” Maybe you missed it; maybe you ignored it; maybe it's gone now. I don't care. Like I said, just wondering how you handled the situation.

I sort of like the way this guy handled the situation:

http://www.14ers.com/php14ers/tripreport.php?trip=7080&parmuser=The+Old+Fart&cpgm=tripuser

By the way, my son is a 23-year-old adult


ScottyVG

Mt. Bross     2012-06-25 15:28:59
I'm not 100%, but I don't believe the summit of Mt. Bross is closed. What is closed and is stated many times on the trail signs is the trail from kite lake directly to the top of Mt. Bross. Which if you do want to summit mt. Bross I would highly recommend going from Lincoln to Bross, then Bross back to Cameron and back down the western route going by mt. Democrat. The trail that goes from kite lake to mt. Bross is steep and packed full of loose rocks that are too easy slip on.


docfrance


Cool     2012-06-25 23:44:31
I still wouldn't send an inexperienced, 1st timer who's exhausted down the easiest 14er alone.

I took your initial response post as snide and accusational--and responded in kind. Sadly, notes on fora like this may not convey real sentiments to everyone. I didn't see that sign and no one in our group of 20 pointed it out to me if they did--and they would, I think.

See you on the mountains. I'll have a handshake and a photo for you as I do everyone. I won't say I never break rules or obey all of the signs I've seen (e.g., I hike the Manitou Incline regularly), but i DO take care of everyone with whom I hike and take safety and health very seriously.



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