Winter Hiking Needs

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing.
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RoanMtnMan
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby RoanMtnMan » Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:26 pm

Dex wrote:
I went to the site.

http://www.whittakermountaineering.com/shop-by-summit/rainier

"Most backpacks have a pocket on the side to hold a bottle and those pockets were designed to accommodate a Nalgene bottle because hikers have trusted Nalgene for over twenty years."

http://www.whittakermountaineering.com/shop-by-summit/denali


Does something need clarification with the system? Carrying your hydration bottle in your pack next to your back is what one should do in cold weather to limit freezing. Apologies, but I am confused on your point. I don't currently have any affiliation with Whittaker Mountaineering, it's just one of the few places in the states where you can get that particular setup that I know of. If they give bad info, that is their problem, but the system has worked for me in some pretty harsh environments.
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RoanMtnMan
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby RoanMtnMan » Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:40 pm

It is a funny comment coming from the Whittakers of all people. Last I checked they still own Rainier, de facto. But yes, obviously do not carry your water bottle externally in a cold environment.
Always follow the 7 P's. Proper Planning & Preparation, Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.

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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby ThuChad » Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:49 pm

Has anyone constructed their own Nalgene insulator sleeve? It seems like throwing it in a sock with a hand warmer would work for most situations but surely someone has gotten a little craftier than that.
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RoanMtnMan
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby RoanMtnMan » Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:21 pm

ThuChad wrote:Has anyone constructed their own Nalgene insulator sleeve? It seems like throwing it in a sock with a hand warmer would work for most situations but surely someone has gotten a little craftier than that.


A creative solution for occasional trips. I would go with an old wool sock, tape two hard warmers around the lower part of the bottle and maybe one on the bottom. I haven't tried it but it should work. If you get out a lot, it may be more economical to find a more permanent system though.

Folks have been known to successfully turn old closed cell foam pads into water bottle insulators. If you have one laying around, the cost comes down to duct tape.
Always follow the 7 P's. Proper Planning & Preparation, Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.

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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby ak47 » Wed Jan 09, 2013 8:42 am

I always carry a thermos of hot water or tea, it will never freeze.
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby Scott P » Wed Jan 09, 2013 8:50 am

Has anyone constructed their own Nalgene insulator sleeve? It seems like throwing it in a sock with a hand warmer would work for most situations but surely someone has gotten a little craftier than that.


It may work on some days, but I'd guess it wouldn't work at all on a cold day (and some days are in the -30's in the mountains). I've had Nalgenes freeze while wrapped in a seperate down coat while also tucked inside the down coat I was wearing. An insulated thermos is the way to go on those cold days.

Here is a little experiement at around 0F.

http://www.summitpost.org/cold-weather-test-for-water-bottles/346816
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby chrismjx » Wed Jan 09, 2013 5:20 pm

Djslais wrote:hey chris, did you make it to RMNP? If so, how were the conditions?


Alright, made it up there today, not quite all the way to the Loch, but close. Beautiful day for being out hiking! :-D The trail is in pretty darn good shape and has obviously seen a lot of traffic. It's packed snow the whole way, although the packed area gets much narrower as you get higher up. We brought gaiters and microspikes, and definitely didn't need them at all, but it was nice to have them. We saw people in everything from street clothes and leather boots, to full-on winter gear with snowshoes etc. We would've been totally fine in zip-offs and just our regular hiking shoes I think...

If someone can instruct me on how to insert images here, I will post the pics I got. When I click the "Img" button, it just inserts HTML code, and I don't have an image hosting site or anything... Can't I just upload?
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby Somewhat of a Prick » Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:03 am

randalmartin wrote:I will never take a Camelback on a winter trip again. Even with blowing out the line after every use I have found little bits of water remaining in the area around the mouthpiece, those freeze and build up. Way too much risk. I typically take a 1 liter REI insulated thermos of something hot, another liter of water or sports drink in my pack. You can get heat patches (similar to the hand warmers but with a sticky side) and attach to your water bottle(s) for an extra measure of security and so that you are not drinking ice cold water (which quickly lowers your core temperature).


http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-Products-Tycoon-Hydration-100-Ounce/dp/B00598GW6Y/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1357916594&sr=8-15&keywords=winter+camelbak

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Catalyst
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby Catalyst » Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:39 am

I've got a question about a layering system, and thought I would get some advice before going and spending a lot of money on jackets. Putting it in here instead of starting a new thread because there already seem to be so many related to this stuff.

How does this sound for a winter condition layering system for upper body.

Silk-weight Baselayer
Long sleeve Patagonia Capilene
fleece
Arcteryx gamma mx hoody
marmot oracle or marmot precip or patagonia torrentshell


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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby DaveSwink » Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:49 am

Catalyst wrote:How does this sound for a winter condition layering system for upper body.

Silk-weight Baselayer
Long sleeve Patagonia Capilene
fleece
Arcteryx gamma mx hoody
marmot oracle or marmot precip or patagonia torrentshell


Looks pretty good. Minor tweeks:
Leave out the fleece or you will be too hot while moving. Carry a hooded puffy layer to throw on when you stop longer than two - three minutes, or if it is really, really cold (below 0 degrees).
Trade the silk-weight baselayer for a baselayer with a hood, 1/4 zip, and thumb loops.
Be sure your Capilene has a zip to allow greater temperature flexibility.
Last edited by DaveSwink on Tue Jan 15, 2013 11:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby GregMiller » Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:56 am

I'll second the hooded layer recommendation, I used to wonder just how useful it was until I got one with a hood, it's amazing. Fits under a helmet, does most of the job of a balaclava for me, it's amazing.

Get the Patagonia R1 hoody if you want to be super warm, or be like I did and find the Eddie Bauer FA one if you want something a little lighter or want to save some money if you find it on sale.
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Re: Winter Hiking Needs

Postby metalmountain » Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:57 am

Somewhat of a prick wrote:
randalmartin wrote:I will never take a Camelback on a winter trip again. Even with blowing out the line after every use I have found little bits of water remaining in the area around the mouthpiece, those freeze and build up. Way too much risk. I typically take a 1 liter REI insulated thermos of something hot, another liter of water or sports drink in my pack. You can get heat patches (similar to the hand warmers but with a sticky side) and attach to your water bottle(s) for an extra measure of security and so that you are not drinking ice cold water (which quickly lowers your core temperature).


http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-Products-Tycoon-Hydration-100-Ounce/dp/B00598GW6Y/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1357916594&sr=8-15&keywords=winter+camelbak

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The problem is the mouth pieces will still freeze. When you start getting below zero temps its basically impossible to keep them from freezing. Once its gets down in the teens (wind chill or temp) I stop using my camelback. Its just too much of a hassle in my opinion. Once the mouthpiece freezes up solid good luck getting it thawed out.

My go to method now is that I take my camelback bladder and store it as normal in my pack, I just disconnect the hose. The heat from my body seems to keep it from freezing up. Then I take my nalgene bottle, fill it up then wrap it in my extra fleece layer. The nalgene did start icing up after a few hours though. Once the nalgene is empty I just pull out the bladder and fill it back up. Was out at Mills Lake ice climbing Sunday in below zero temps all day and nothing froze up.
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