Dogs on 14ers

Dogs, dogs and even some cats
Forum rules
Let's try to keep the topics related to mountaineering, please.
CORed
Posts: 61
Joined: 8/24/2011
14er Checklist (10)
13er Checklist (10)

Re: Dogs on 14ers

Postby CORed » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:07 pm

bonehead wrote:A little historical perspective maybe.
Not that I'm a big fan of horse crap, but:
Horse packers (with their dogs) have a much longer history in the high country than backpackers, hikers and climbers.
My first adventures in the Sierras in the sixties found way more horses than hikers.
Of course it's the other way around now.
Back then I think they had the same disdain for backpackers as we now seem to have for them.


I've done quite a bit of fishing and hiking in NW Wyoming, and in the Teton ans Washakie wilderness areas, I still encounter a lot more horse packers than hikers or backpackers. They are almost invariably accompanied by unleashed Australian Shepherds.
User avatar
skier25
Posts: 1111
Joined: 6/12/2006
14er Checklist (43)
14ers Skied (10)
14ers in Winter (1)

Re: Dogs on 14ers

Postby skier25 » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:23 pm

All I know is, I can't trust you or your dog, so please keep it on a leash.
I get acute mountain sickness when I am away from the mountains.
User avatar
The Pathfinder
Posts: 4
Joined: 7/3/2012
14er Checklist Not Entered

Re: Dogs on 14ers

Postby The Pathfinder » Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:04 pm

Hey all,

Flatlander here. I plan to visit Colorado in late September to do as much hiking and camping as the weather will permit. It will be just me and my 3 year old Black Lab. We will do as much cardio training as possible to prepare for the workout we will get while out there, but living at 900' there is only so much we can do. I plan to spend at least 3 days at 10,000'-12,000' to aclimate before attempting a few of the "easy" 14ers but I was wondering if anyone has any ideas how quickly I can expect my dog to adjust.

She is in superb physical shape (if I took as good care of myself as I do her I would be running marathons before breakfast and doing triathalons every weekend) so I am not really worried about her except for the things that cannot be prepared for. She has very long legs and has no problems getting up and over 4' boulders. She LOVES snow, water and woods. I've done 8+ mile hikes through the roughest terrain around here and she ran circles around me the entire time. I've taken her snowshoeing in over 3' of snow (it was a 3 hour expedition for me) and she again ran circles around me.

Do dogs get AMS? I get a mild case every year when we ski Colorado, but nothing that keeps me off the hills. When hiking I will keep a ton of water with me so she can drink as much as she wants.

I will be getting a set of those "dog booties" with matching socks from REI that everyone raves about even though I am not sure if she will need them. She's been over some pretty tough ground here and she's never had a problem, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.

Does anyone have any thoughts?

Thanks!

PS - First post here on 14ers.com!
Last edited by The Pathfinder on Thu Jul 19, 2012 7:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
"The only thing that's for sure is nothing's for sure." ~ Sting (The pro wrestler...not the singer.)
*
"As soon as the weather clears I'm gonna pull on my toque, eat some Canadian bacon and, uh, I'm keen to give 'er!" - Shane McConkey
*
Yeah, I'm a n00b from the flatlands. But I'm learning so please bear with me.
User avatar
Floyd
Posts: 1120
Joined: 7/16/2006
14er Checklist (58)
13er Checklist (99)

Re: Dogs on 14ers

Postby Floyd » Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:33 pm

The Pathfinder wrote:Do dogs get AMS?


Yes, but I haven't seen any symptoms with my lab. Who knows, he may just be tougher than me and not show it.

The Pathfinder wrote:I will be getting a set of those "dog booties" with matching socks from REI that everyone raves about even though I am not sure if she will need them. She's been over some pretty tough ground here and she's never had a problem, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.


I would recommend them, but wait to put them on her until you see a problem with her pads. If your lab is anything like Floyd, her nails will eat through those booties long before her pads would see any wear and tear. $50/trip for booties is pretty steep.

Have fun!
"Athletes express themselves physically, this is their art. As an athlete, exhausting oneself on the field or or on the track or on the trail or on the mountain brings calm and satisfaction. Thrashing about… our expression." - Steve Gleason

Return to “Pets on Peaks”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests