Cerro Torre

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aecrew618
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Cerro Torre

Postby aecrew618 » Wed Sep 13, 2006 6:59 pm

This is not really related to 14ers because this mountain is only about 10,000 feet. But Is Cerro Torre in the Patagonia still considered the hardest mountain climb in the world?
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Postby Kiefer » Thu Sep 14, 2006 12:09 am

I read an article on this peak a few months back (in Backpacker?) about an older climb that is being disputed (there were no bolts or equip. found past the prominant notch on the right). Based from what I read, the weather and the pics I can certainly understand this claim.
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This thing looks brutal! :shock:

This page has a really good synopsis on the peak. Check it out.
http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock/152103/cerro-torre.html
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bustaheel
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Postby bustaheel » Thu Sep 14, 2006 7:54 am

The route you are talking about is on the North face. A team recently completed a parallel that route that is why they know that there are no bolts on the old route.

If this is not the hardest anymore, which I have heard, then it is still definately up there.
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Bullwinkle
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Torres of Patagonia

Postby Bullwinkle » Thu Dec 28, 2006 6:44 pm

Have not climbed this beast, but have been there up close and personal. This area is one of the most beautiful and unspoiled on earth--and I have 60+ countries and all 50 states to compare against. I used to live in Chile and traveled down to Patagonia (Chile and Argentine sides) on occasion. This special place, which has its own micro-climate, is several hours north of Punta Arenas--which is on the Straits of Magellan. Puerto Natales is the closest village to the Torres del Paine (pronounced "pine") area--which is on the Chilean side. Not much altitude in Patagonia, as it is close to the fjords on the Chilean side and it is largely arid high plains on the Argentine side. About 2,000m tops in the south. Further north, there are a few in the 3,000-4,000m range, with San Valentin/Cerro San Clemente as the highest at 4,058m. In between are some tremendous high lakes and glaciers. Patagonia is a long way (5,000+ miles for most), but the people are great, the food and wine is good, the scenery is stunning, and you've got plenty of elbow room. Recommend a bilingual climbing guide if you go. Remember that seasons are opposite the U.S. Best time to go would be January.
As a mountain more fully reveals itself to a man, so the true nature of the man will be more fully revealed
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skier25
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Postby skier25 » Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:17 pm

What about the Trango Towers? They look really hard, and they've got high altitude as well.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q ... a=N&tab=wi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trango_Towers

http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock ... owers.html

Oh yeah, here's an interview with Cesare Maestri who in 1959 maybe was the 1st to climb Cerro Torre.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adven ... estri.html
I get acute mountain sickness when I am away from the mountains.
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Scott P
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Postby Scott P » Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:05 am

But Is Cerro Torre in the Patagonia still considered the hardest mountain climb in the world?


I don't think so, but I don't know what is. In the book Into Thin Air, John Krakauer says that at one time Cerro Torre was considered the toughest peak in the world, but no more. Unfortunately, he doesn't say what is.

It would probably be hard to judge and not all mountains have been climbed yet.

K2 has the reputation about being a very hard mountain. Gasherbrum IV is even supposed to be harder than K2.

Shivling has some really long vertical routes, but it has been climbed several times now and I don't think it ranks among the most difficult at all. Still, I thought I would mention it here since all routes to the summit require 52-75 pitches of vertical rock, and it is an impressive mountain.

Ogre is supposed to be a tough one.

I've read that the hardest route to date ever put up on a mountain was the Russian route up the South Face of Lhotse, but it would be hard to judge since no one has climbed every difficult routein the world and could choose between them.
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guitmo223
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Postby guitmo223 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:11 am

Those look cool, but climbable.

From what I've heard from an outfitter friend of mine who has been there, some of the most remote and un-hikable mountains are in Afghanistan. Probably where Osama is hiding out.

skier25 wrote:What about the Trango Towers? They look really hard, and they've got high altitude as well.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q ... a=N&tab=wi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trango_Towers

http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock ... owers.html

Oh yeah, here's an interview with Cesare Maestri who in 1959 maybe was the 1st to climb Cerro Torre.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adven ... estri.html
"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred it be postponed" - Sir Winston Churchill
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michaelkostal
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Re: Cerro Torre

Postby michaelkostal » Mon Jan 22, 2007 9:40 pm

Sorry, I'm relatively new to the whole climbing world but when you live in Chicago (as I do) you spend more time reading about climbing than actually climbing.

As for "most difficult" climbs go, I'd assume the routes that have never been climbed should be considerred - however the difference between "most difficult" & suicidal begin to approach eachother at a certain point. However 2 routes that have been climbed that would get my vote for "most difficult" are found on this K2climb.net site (below). Check out #2 Russian Jannu Exp. & K2's Magic Line. Both of these are crazy. Then, if you want to take it a step further, doing them solo would definitely up the ante.

http://www.k2climb.net/story/BestofExpl ... 2004.shtml

My vote would be find the most insane combination of altitute, vertical gain, weather, slope & location and you've got the winner. However then you've also got to find someone willing to attempt it.
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