Longs, My first 14er

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paully
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Postby paully » Fri Jul 07, 2006 1:29 pm

Nice post. I enjoyed the trip report. Where ya from?
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Cornfed97
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Postby Cornfed97 » Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:51 am

Funny....I dont remember the Homestrech being class 4. was it snowed over?
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strat1080
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Postby strat1080 » Fri Dec 22, 2006 10:38 am

Most of the Class 3 that I've seen is more like, use your hands if you want for comfort. With Class 4 you have no choice but to use your hands. Trust me, if thousands of unexperienced hikers can climb Longs Peak every year and not die, it doesn't have any Class 4 pitches or moves. I honestly can't really tell much of a difference between difficult Class 2 and 3. Wetterhorn to me is the only Class 3 that I've done that remotely resembles climbing. I was able to walk up and down the last pitch with minimal use of my hands. Kit Carson to me was rather easy and didn't really feel that I came across any Class 3 sections or pitches. I guess climbing Lindsey's NW Ridge route in icy conditions without crampons changed my definition of 14er difficulty. After doing that I've developed a sense of what is actually climbing and what is just simply scrambling with occasional use of hands. Climbing a 30' pitch of Class 4 in icy conditions with no rope or crampons is hairy to say the least. This was before I began using my head when making mountaineering decisions of course.

percious wrote:No snow. Perhaps it was class 3, but if you had to use hands to climb it and if you fell it would likely be fatal. For a flat lander like me it *felt* 4th class. Perception is reality, no?

-percious
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Bean
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Postby Bean » Fri Dec 22, 2006 6:05 pm

percious wrote:Part III - Mount Elbert
http://www.percious.com/hiking/HP/Colorado%202006/report/part3.html

Image

-percious
Why did you rope up on Elbert?
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guitmo223
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Postby guitmo223 » Fri Dec 22, 2006 9:37 pm

Next time, try MREs for your evening dinner - they might weigh a little more, but they're a heck of lot easier. You also don't have to worry about bringing cooking gear or washing pans; just some nasty plastic and aluminum wrappers you have to carry out.

And instead of spending precious time preparing meals, you can just mac out and appreciate the sunset (or snowstorm as the case may be).

And just out of curiosity, why did you rope up on Elbert?
"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred it be postponed" - Sir Winston Churchill
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XkyleX
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Postby XkyleX » Sat Dec 23, 2006 9:08 am

After practicing some self-arrest with Ben, we were on our way. The snowfield was fairly shallow so I decided not to place any pickets, since there was a bit of run out, and I was sure that between Erich and I we could stop this wagon train if need be. The rope was a solidifying factor in our party, as we all had to move at the same pace. Chad stopped to adjust his crampons and I just stood with a grin on my face. We were here in CO doing what I had come to do. Snow climbing on a sunny warm day is just about my favourite thing to do. We all dismounted the snow slide, removing our crampons to move off to the next snowfield...

Seriously, I'm so lost!
Kill the doubt inside your head. We overcome. We push ahead. -Modern Life Is War

There are 10 types of people in this world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.
- 1 Corinthians 18
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Bean
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Postby Bean » Sat Dec 23, 2006 8:22 pm

I bet if you hadn't wasted time with rope, axes, crampons, pickets, and whatever else you had on you, that extra hour you wanted wouldn't have been necessary. I was plunge stepping down those very same snow fields this october. If I had fallen, the snow was so soft I would've simply stopped.

Move quickly. If you have to lighten your load for that, then do so.
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strat1080
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Postby strat1080 » Tue Jan 02, 2007 7:35 am

That is very true. I've been reading Connally's The Mountaineering Handbook religiously lately and he never fails to mention to only bringing what is needed. The most important element of successful mountaineering is light mountaineering. The less gear you bring and the lighter your pack the faster you move. Moving faster is more likely to save or help you than having 20# of extra gear.

Bean wrote:I bet if you hadn't wasted time with rope, axes, crampons, pickets, and whatever else you had on you, that extra hour you wanted wouldn't have been necessary. I was plunge stepping down those very same snow fields this october. If I had fallen, the snow was so soft I would've simply stopped.

Move quickly. If you have to lighten your load for that, then do so.
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strat1080
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Postby strat1080 » Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:36 am

I could see maybe roping up for a steep gully but in some of the pictures you guys were roped up on almost completely flat terrain. As long as all your party members had crampons and either trekking poles/axe you would have been fine without a rope. If you didn't feel confident in your party members' skills to self-arrest and you were actually planning to summit Elbert maybe you should have taken a different route. I would venture to guess that being on a 14,000 foot mountain too late in the afternoon is probably more dangerous than iffy run-out. If you slide down the snow you should be able to slow down momentum enough to avoid serious injury, however if you get zapped by lightning your chances of survival are pretty slim. Make it a sold practice to be below tree-line before noon. I just can't really see the need for roping up on something like Elbert. As they say in mountaineering, a solo climber is one who falls alone, a roped group is one who falls together. Mt Elbert isn't Mt Rainier or another heavy glaciated peak. You don't have to worry about slipping into a crevasse or anything of that nature.
Quit whining and move your %$# up that mountain.
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Mel McKinney
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Postby Mel McKinney » Mon Feb 05, 2007 8:06 am

Enjoyed reading the report on Longs. Glad you all were able to discuss the breakdown in communication regarding the descent in the storm. I've been in the situation of herding a group down the mountain when the lightning and hail are getting closer and closer. Not fun! :)

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