Eating and combating nausea on the trails

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14er_Crazy
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Eating and combating nausea on the trails

Postby 14er_Crazy » Sat Sep 29, 2007 4:51 pm

Sorry if this is the wrong place to post!

I'd like some ideas on combating nausea and picking the right foods on 14ers. I've got 16 14ers (and many other CO mtns) under my belt, so I'm not a complete newbie to this. However lately, I've been getting nausea on the trail. The thought of eating anything after getting nausea makes me even more nauseous. Of course, not eating makes me lose energy, which in turn makes traveling slower. It's a vicious cycle.

What I've been packing is an apple (or 2), trailmix, and perhaps some beef jerky. Are there other types of foods that I will help settle my stomach? Does carbing up the night before help out? What about foods and drinks before starting off?

Are any others suffering through this? What have you done?

Thanks in advance!
Nausea at altitude, bad knees coming down, high winds, snow, gropple, the occasional thunderstorm and lightning... MAN, I love 14ers!
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skier25
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Postby skier25 » Sat Sep 29, 2007 5:06 pm

Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches. Surprisingly, I am happy to eat these while hiking, and they really taste good on a break. Hard boiled eggs with salt make a good breakfast. Use a cheap plastic container to store both so they don't get crushed.
I get acute mountain sickness when I am away from the mountains.
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Couloirman
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Postby Couloirman » Sat Sep 29, 2007 6:25 pm

Hammer nutrition 'Perpetuem' and 'Sustained energy'. Its pretty much like drinking sweet bread dough. I couldnt eat for a while while hiking either so i switched exclusively to these products. They even have lactic acid buffers in them to make your legs not hurt so bad. Now that Ive done a lot more hiking I can eat regular food again so I have big ass bottles sitting around, but they were a miracle for me when I needed them. Just hike more and itll probably go away.
Couloir than you are
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mtgirl
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Postby mtgirl » Sat Sep 29, 2007 6:36 pm

I start every hike and climb in the altitude with 2 aspirin (to thin the blood) and 2 Tums (to settle my stomach). It's always done the trick for me...
"Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away."
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rlw49
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Postby rlw49 » Sat Sep 29, 2007 6:38 pm

Try something kind of bland with some salt. I've traded in my gorp for a cheesy bagel and/or string cheese. You'll probably just have to experiment on the trail.
Good Luck
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Ineedaltitude
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Postby Ineedaltitude » Sat Sep 29, 2007 6:49 pm

mtgirl wrote:I start every hike and climb in the altitude with 2 aspirin (to thin the blood) and 2 Tums (to settle my stomach). It's always done the trick for me...


Did you know that the active ingredient in aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid, and that Tums, mainly calcium carbonate, is an acid neutralizer?
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Gossnath
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Postby Gossnath » Sat Sep 29, 2007 7:03 pm

I never could eat much either until I started eating a banana right after getting up and another an hour later. For some reason after that I can usually eat anything after that.
I know a lot of people who eat apples, but that never worked for me cause the acid gets to me.
Anybody ever try ProBars? They cost about $4, and I can't explain why but they are amazing. Makes Clif Bars seem like eating sand.
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rlw49
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Postby rlw49 » Sat Sep 29, 2007 7:43 pm

acid and tums is apples and oranges. The drug is not neutralized, it's still active. Thats why they make bufferin (buffered aspirin). However, some people still get upset stomach from aspirin.
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gatorchick
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Postby gatorchick » Sat Sep 29, 2007 8:23 pm

Couloirman wrote:Hammer nutrition 'Perpetuem' and 'Sustained energy'.


DITTO THIS! Mix it up strong and sip on it while you hike (along with plenty of water). I have never used it hiking (but plan to ... just getting into this) but it has worked FABULOUSLY for other endeavors. And I have a sensitive stomach.
Jen

"In her heart she knows that sometimes a dog can be as good as any man ..." - widespread panic (slightly edited)
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Gossnath
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Postby Gossnath » Sat Sep 29, 2007 9:10 pm

Summit beers are always good too
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ccunnin
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Postby ccunnin » Sat Sep 29, 2007 11:36 pm

Water, water, and water the night before a climb. Binge on carbs the night before. Have you ever tried a decongestant and ibuprofen. That cured it for my girlfriend. Her ears would plug and pressure would build up. That made her nauseated.
It's a shot.
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ajkagy
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Postby ajkagy » Sun Sep 30, 2007 10:43 am

Gossnath wrote:Summit beers are always good too


hehe, a nice 40oz will take the edge off

never had any nausea while climbing so my advice may be just a shot in the dark. Come to think of it, i never get headache at altitude either...

I would think some kind of bread/tums combination would settle the stomach, then wash it down with some gatorade.

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