Double Boots & Crampons

Info on gear, conditioning, and preparation for hiking/climbing.
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SnowAlien
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby SnowAlien » Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:02 am

mts4602 wrote:
pvnisher wrote:Alternately, you can get the hybrid style (with a lever in the back and strap in the front). They are faster to put on and off, which can be handy.
And they can also fit on lighter weight mountaineering boots with just a heel welt (plastic chunk in the back), but not a toe welt. I use my 3-season boots (with heel welt) more than any other boot. For lower climbs in the Alps and even mid-summer on Rainier they were fine.

You mentioned getting a 3 season mountaineering boot, can you recommend one? I looked at the Nepals and it seems like they have a toe and heal welt, but maybe I just dont know what I'm looking at.


I agree with pvnisher. I got more rigid boots first, could not get used to them and switched to La Sportiva Trango (actually pretty shocked to find out they are 3-season boots :roll: ). I used them for winter mountaineering in Colorado, spring snow climbs and 2 climbs on Rainier this summer - they work just fine. They do get a bit cold for standing around on very cold days, but I think many sturdier boots are not immune to that problem. I use Grivel G12 semi-automatic (new-matic) crampons with them which seems to work great so far.
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby kaiman » Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:31 am

mts4602 wrote:You are right. I already have jackets, tents, sleeping bags etc for different types of weather/climbs so it only makes sense for boots to be the same. I guess I just figured I'd go with the high end boots right off the bat and use them for climbs where they might be overkill, but that's kind of dumb.

You mentioned getting a 3 season mountaineering boot, can you recommend one? I looked at the Nepals and it seems like they have a toe and heal welt, but maybe I just dont know what I'm looking at.

Matt


I have a pair of La Sportiva Glaciers that I have used for winter/spring climbs in Colorado/Utah as well as summer snow climbs in the Cascades. They work great and have kept me plenty warm. They are a little lighter duty then the Nepal's others are recommending, but also cost quite a bit less. Unfortunately I think they only make the WLF (wildfire fighters) model now which don't have the rubberized toe box on them. The pair I have are more like the Makalu model. Mine don't have toe welts but fit my BD Sabretooth strap crampons perfectly.

When I was climbing in Oregon and California this summer I saw quite a few folks who were wearing La Sportiva's Trangos which are a 3 season model that come in both a toe welt and no toe welt models. I know others here also use them quite a bit in the Colorado mountains. Also, don't feel limited by the toe welt, you can use crampons with straps on pretty much any model and don't have to get a pair with front bales unless you want to.

kaiman
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby Alby426 » Fri Sep 21, 2012 11:10 am

What size, I may have a barely used Scarpa pair in size 11
Let me know.
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pvnisher
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby pvnisher » Fri Sep 21, 2012 1:20 pm

mts4602 wrote:You mentioned getting a 3 season mountaineering boot, can you recommend one? I looked at the Nepals and it seems like they have a toe and heal welt, but maybe I just dont know what I'm looking at.


I have a pair of Vasque Optimators that I love, use them year-round. Fairly stiff, but a nice camber to the sole so walking is easy. Heel welt, gore-tex, super tough. Climbed low 5th class in them and walked 14+ miles in one day. Most comfortable boots for long days that I own. I like them more than trail shoes or flexible boots.

The best pair of three-season mountaineering boots are the ones that fit you best.
Look for something uninsulated, and generally that means it won't have a toe welt, since boots with toe welts generally are insulated. Generally.

In the UK we have a boot and crampon rating system (B1, B2, B3, B3 boots are fully rigid and insulated, suitable for frontpointing on ice, B2 are general mountaineering, B1 are hiking (hill walking) boots). C1, C2, C3 crampons are the same way (C3 for steep ice and mixed, C2 for all-around, C1 for easy approaches and moderate glaciers).

B2 boots will work for spring snow in CO, fall snow, and winter hikes at lower elevations. They are the most versatile in my opinion.

I wish the US had that system, it makes things easier. Match your crampon rating to your boot rating.

Maybe search on UK sites, and find a boot that is B2, which will match with either C1 or C2 crampons.
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby RoanMtnMan » Fri Sep 21, 2012 1:33 pm

Deleted.
Last edited by RoanMtnMan on Fri Sep 21, 2012 5:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Always follow the 7 P's. Proper Planning & Preparation, Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.

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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby pvnisher » Fri Sep 21, 2012 3:26 pm

RoanMtnMan wrote:A pound on your foot equals seven on your back from an physical output standpoint.


I agree with your intent, and your points, but those numbers are so false as to be laughable. I've been training with 5lb ankle weights, and it's nowhere near as taxing (even on steep uphills) as even 35lbs on my back (much less 70 lbs if you count the 10 total).
After work I can motor up the hill near my house (about 700' vertical, under 1 mile distance) without breathing hard if I don't have a pack but DO have the weights.
When I put on a 35 pound pack (but no weights), I'm breathing hard and sweating profusely for the same pace.

Again, I have no disagreement with your post, just the number 7.
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby Gabriel » Fri Sep 21, 2012 4:14 pm

I like my Scarpa Omega boots with Intuition liners. Very warm and light for a full plastic. For high alt snow and ice routes I have the camp 390 crampons. For routes with significant mixed climbing and waterfall ice I use an older pair of Lowe foot fangs.

For Rainier in summer on the standard routes you really don't need plastic or stiff boots. A solid hiking boot with an insulating insole and warm sock combo works fine. Flexible strap on crampons work well with hiking boots.

G
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Re: Double Boots & Crampons

Postby RoanMtnMan » Fri Sep 21, 2012 5:18 pm

pvnisher wrote:
RoanMtnMan wrote:A pound on your foot equals seven on your back from an physical output standpoint.


I agree with your intent, and your points, but those numbers are so false as to be laughable. I've been training with 5lb ankle weights, and it's nowhere near as taxing (even on steep uphills) as even 35lbs on my back (much less 70 lbs if you count the 10 total).
After work I can motor up the hill near my house (about 700' vertical, under 1 mile distance) without breathing hard if I don't have a pack but DO have the weights.
When I put on a 35 pound pack (but no weights), I'm breathing hard and sweating profusely for the same pace.

Again, I have no disagreement with your post, just the number 7.


There have been many mixed experiment results in regards to this subject. And your example is a good one. It was a bad post as far as complete fact goes. And that is the point of this site. Deleted. The lightness and comfort of newer boots was probably a better argument. I can say from a personal, though anecdotal, standpoint I move much faster and more comfortably with plastic boots on my back and trail shoes on my feet. I also wouldn't think of wearing a double plastic in the lower 48. The new leather/synthetic options are so much better and more versatile. La Sportiva and Scarpa are my personal favorite manufacturers. And try not to buy too much boot, most people end up doing that. Though I do have a beater pair of Scarpa Invernos size 12 with two sets of liners on the cheap, PM me. Heavy use but still a few trips left on them.
Always follow the 7 P's. Proper Planning & Preparation, Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.

"An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” --Marco Polo

www.CalebWrayPhotography.com

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