Hooded down jacket recommendations

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kaiman
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Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby kaiman » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:24 pm

Hi everyone,

Since we're in the fall climbing season and getting closer to winter, I am in the market for a good medium weight hooded down jacket. I have been looking at the following models, but have been having a hard time deciding which way to go. I don't care whether it is synthetic or real down and the only requirements I have is that it is under $300, somewhat water resistant, isn't too snug fitting (as I want to be able to put 1-2 layers underneath it) and has a somewhat helmet compatible hood (although that isn't a requirement as I can wear my hat or balaclava under my helmet).

Here are my current choices:

Mountain Hardware Ghost Whisperer, Mountain Hardware Nitrous, Mountain Hardware Compressor, Mountain Hardware B'Laymen, Patagonia Down Sweater, The North Face Catalyst Micro

Does anyone one have any experience with these, suggestions, or other models they prefer?

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

kaiman
"I want to keep the mountains clean of racism, religion and politics. In the mountains this should play no role."

- Joe Stettner

"I haven't climbed Everest, skied to the poles, or sailed single-handed around the world. The goals I set out to accomplish aren't easily measured or quantified by world records or "firsts." The reasons I climb, and the climbs I do, are about more than distance or altitude, they are about breaking barriers within myself."

- Andy Kirkpatrick
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Dave B
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby Dave B » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:30 pm

Anyone of your choices and you'll be spending way too much money.

Mont Bell UL Down Parka

$189

9.5 oz.

Warm and good.

The only slight potential complaint is the durability of the 15 denier nylon. I've had mine for three seasons of rock climbing and BC skiing and never had a problem with it though.

If that's a huge concern, get the UL Thermawrap pro (synthetic) which has a beefier 30 denier or the Frost Smoke Parka which has 40 denier reinforcements on high wear areas.

Also, the Alpine Light Down has more fill, 30 denier nylon and is really warm (this is my winter belay/camp jacket)

Mont Bell makes the best down for the price.
The mountains - whose summits reach or exceed arbitrary thresholds for elevation and prominence - are calling and I must go.

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dnye
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby dnye » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:36 pm

I would just watch steepandcheap.com, they are always selling down jackets. I just bought one for 70% off. Very happy with it.
kaiman
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby kaiman » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:42 pm

Dave B wrote:Anyone of your choices and you'll be spending way too much money.

Mont Bell UL Down Parka

$189

9.5 oz.

Warm and good.

The only slight potential complaint is the durability of the 15 denier nylon. I've had mine for three seasons of rock climbing and BC skiing and never had a problem with it though.

If that's a huge concern, get the UL Thermawrap pro (synthetic) which has a beefier 30 denier or the Frost Smoke Parka which has 40 denier reinforcements on high wear areas.

Also, the Alpine Light Down has more fill, 30 denier nylon and is really warm (this is my winter belay/camp jacket)

Mont Bell makes the best down for the price.


Thanks for the recommendation. How well do these Mont Bell jackets breath?
"I want to keep the mountains clean of racism, religion and politics. In the mountains this should play no role."

- Joe Stettner

"I haven't climbed Everest, skied to the poles, or sailed single-handed around the world. The goals I set out to accomplish aren't easily measured or quantified by world records or "firsts." The reasons I climb, and the climbs I do, are about more than distance or altitude, they are about breaking barriers within myself."

- Andy Kirkpatrick
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Dave B
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby Dave B » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:45 pm

kaiman wrote:
Dave B wrote:Anyone of your choices and you'll be spending way too much money.

Mont Bell UL Down Parka

$189

9.5 oz.

Warm and good.

The only slight potential complaint is the durability of the 15 denier nylon. I've had mine for three seasons of rock climbing and BC skiing and never had a problem with it though.

If that's a huge concern, get the UL Thermawrap pro (synthetic) which has a beefier 30 denier or the Frost Smoke Parka which has 40 denier reinforcements on high wear areas.

Also, the Alpine Light Down has more fill, 30 denier nylon and is really warm (this is my winter belay/camp jacket)

Mont Bell makes the best down for the price.


Thanks for the recommendation. How well do these Mont Bell jackets breath?


About as well as any nylon wind shirt would breathe (i.e. not very well) but with two layers of nylon.

If you're looking for breathability the Arc'teryx Atom LT/SV are both incredibly breathable for insulation. I happen to think Arc'teryx cuts their jackets too short though, so I'm not a huge fan of those two.
The mountains - whose summits reach or exceed arbitrary thresholds for elevation and prominence - are calling and I must go.

-John Muir
kaiman
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby kaiman » Thu Sep 13, 2012 12:52 pm

Dave B wrote:About as well as any nylon wind shirt would breathe (i.e. not very well) but with two layers of nylon.

If you're looking for breathability the Arc'teryx Atom LT/SV are both incredibly breathable for insulation. I happen to think Arc'teryx cuts their jackets too short though, so I'm not a huge fan of those two.


I've had the same problem with the Arc'teryx jackets being too short in the past, plus they seem to be more expensive then other brands... Although that Atom LT isn't too badly priced at $219.
"I want to keep the mountains clean of racism, religion and politics. In the mountains this should play no role."

- Joe Stettner

"I haven't climbed Everest, skied to the poles, or sailed single-handed around the world. The goals I set out to accomplish aren't easily measured or quantified by world records or "firsts." The reasons I climb, and the climbs I do, are about more than distance or altitude, they are about breaking barriers within myself."

- Andy Kirkpatrick
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Ramfan24
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby Ramfan24 » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:33 pm

I really like my MontBell as well. Crazy warm for how light it is.
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby blazebo » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:36 pm

i have the mountain hardware nitrous. i think it is not warm enough by itself. about as good as a heavy fleece. i bought a kelvinator as well, to add warmth while belaying. havent tried it out yet. i have a marmot 8000m for the really cold days.
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JB99
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby JB99 » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:38 pm

I really like my First Ascent Mountain Guide hooded down jacket (sorry Baron). For me it is perfect as a belay jacket for ice climbing and for winter summits. Well built, nice hood, good warmth and not too heavy. I don't know if they still sell it, but it might be around at a store or online somewhere.
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Theodore
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby Theodore » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:43 pm

I've been pretty happy with my Arcterxy Atom LT hoody. If you can find one on sale, I'd definitely suggest it! I think I found mine for $160.
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MuchosPixels
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby MuchosPixels » Thu Sep 13, 2012 2:10 pm

Hi, I have tried a bunch of insulated jackets over the years and narrowed down my selection to the three I currently keep.

Summer Alpine insulated jacket: Arcteryx Atom LT. Awesome awesome. Great in the winter also as a midlayer.

Shoulder season Alpine and winter jacket: Arcteryx Atom SV. Awesome also.

Winter Parka for extreme cold conditions: Outdoor Research Superplume Down Parka. Bombproof parka but still quite compressible. Its what I use if its going to be around zero or less. Perfect for camp and or belay even if its warmer than 0 up to bout 15F max. Its at its best when its in the single digits or less. Havent tested its limits.

What I love about the arcteryx jackets are the fit and the materials. A lot of the down sweaters leak feathers and the nylon used in most of those down pieces is too shiny and fragile. The Arcteryx use an awesome material thats soft, quiet, not too shiny (in the case of the LT its quite matte!) and both the LT and SV has nice stretchy cuffs that seal heat in great and both look great also!

I havent yet but one could combine the LT and SV to for a great very cold weather system. The LT is also awesome for being active in very cold weather because it breathes incredibly well.

I do have the Patagonia High Loft Down sweater (no hood) for around town use but honestly the Atom SV is warmer and still looks great so I might sell it.
kaiman
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Re: Hooded down jacket recommendations

Postby kaiman » Thu Sep 13, 2012 2:15 pm

Thanks for all the replies everyone. I will check out the Arc'teryx and Mont Bell jackets mentioned as they seem to get the most votes.

kaiman
"I want to keep the mountains clean of racism, religion and politics. In the mountains this should play no role."

- Joe Stettner

"I haven't climbed Everest, skied to the poles, or sailed single-handed around the world. The goals I set out to accomplish aren't easily measured or quantified by world records or "firsts." The reasons I climb, and the climbs I do, are about more than distance or altitude, they are about breaking barriers within myself."

- Andy Kirkpatrick

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