Crampons...what do you wear?

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Jakomait
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weight weenie

Postby Jakomait » Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:40 am

Grivel AirTech Lites. Aluminum, weighs about half of steel crampons but wears out 4.3 times quicker. they end up in my pack on a lot of 14er trips. Good for moderate climbing but not technical. for that i have a set of BD's but I cant remember what model.
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Gabriel
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Postby Gabriel » Wed Dec 12, 2007 10:58 am

I use Grivel airtech. They are alloy and extremely light. I have used them mostly for general snow work, but I also climbed the Grossglockner (Austria) via the Studl Ridge, a rock route in icy conditions without a problem. I thought the alloy might bend, but they did fine. I wouldn't buy metal crampons again, unless I was doing waterfall ice or something with a fairly short aproach.
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jfox
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Postby jfox » Wed Dec 12, 2007 11:06 am

After going back and forth over and over as to which 'pons to get, I decided to go with the G12's after reading this:

G12 is a classic 12-point crampon designed for general mountaineering, alpinism, mixed ice and rock climbing, and moderate waterfall routes. Despite the modern climber’s tendency to use crampons with more technical capacity and weight than necessary it should be remembered that virtually every “hard” alpine route in Alaska or Chamonix may be done with G12
tundraline
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Postby tundraline » Wed Dec 12, 2007 2:47 pm

jfox wrote:After going back and forth over and over as to which 'pons to get, I decided to go with the G12's after reading this:

G12 is a classic 12-point crampon designed for general mountaineering, alpinism, mixed ice and rock climbing, and moderate waterfall routes. Despite the modern climber’s tendency to use crampons with more technical capacity and weight than necessary it should be remembered that virtually every “hard” alpine route in Alaska or Chamonix may be done with G12


You won't be sorry if you buy Grivel crampons. If you're pretty sure technical ice is not in your future, then the G12s will serve you very well indeed.
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Pete M
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Postby Pete M » Wed Dec 12, 2007 3:17 pm

BD 10 point contact strap w/ anti-bot plates. Fits any boot, fine for genral mountaineering, cheap. But no good for technical ice climbing...
I think they make a 12 point version if you have slippery feet. :)
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Yog
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Postby Yog » Wed Dec 12, 2007 3:48 pm

Jfox - I think you'll like your G-12's very much! :)
. . .Now, after the hours of torment . . . I have nothing more to do than breathe . . .I am nothing more than a single, narrow, gasping lung, floating over the mists and the summits.
-Reinhold Messner
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jfox
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Postby jfox » Wed Dec 12, 2007 4:17 pm

Mark Milburn wrote:Jfox - I think you'll like your G-12's very much! :)


Yep. 8)
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