Photographing your climbs

Camera equipment and technique for taking photos.
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Dancesatmoonrise
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby Dancesatmoonrise » Mon Jul 08, 2013 4:58 pm

If I may, I'd like to add one tip I've found useful.

Try to keep in mind that often the best photos come at the very moment when you are forgetting the camera. Times when you are frightened, sketchy areas, bad weather, steep exposure, etc. During these times, we all tend to focus on the climbing at hand, and neglect the camera. This is natural.

But when you look back, you realize you have no photos of what, in retrospect, was the best part of the trip. Stay vigilant, and try to remember to keep the camera handy, and use it, when your natural inclination is exactly the opposite. You'll find some pretty cool photos come out of it.
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forbins_mtn
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby forbins_mtn » Mon Jul 08, 2013 5:30 pm

Dancesatmoonrise wrote:If I may, I'd like to add one tip I've found useful.

Try to keep in mind that often the best photos come at the very moment when you are forgetting the camera. Times when you are frightened, sketchy areas, bad weather, steep exposure, etc. During these times, we all tend to focus on the climbing at hand, and neglect the camera. This is natural.

But when you look back, you realize you have no photos of what, in retrospect, was the best part of the trip. Stay vigilant, and try to remember to keep the camera handy, and use it, when your natural inclination is exactly the opposite. You'll find some pretty cool photos come out of it.


note respectfully taken. let's see what comes out of the Capitol trip this weekend. I'll make sure to snap those photos as soon as I feel the sensation of the dreaded "nervous pee"...that's when i know the best photo will be taken
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centrifuge
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby centrifuge » Tue Jul 09, 2013 6:42 am

I really like this article and it has some great points, esp about the summit photo. The worst, at least in terms of interest, photos out there are the summit photos. Sure, when you are up there you can feel the grandeur but that, even in the 360 shots, just does not come through the same way at all. The best shots are on the way up, esp early morning when alpine glow is at its peak, or an hour before sunset (at least in my humble opinion).

Dancesatmoonrise wrote:If I may, I'd like to add one tip I've found useful.

Try to keep in mind that often the best photos come at the very moment when you are forgetting the camera. Times when you are frightened, sketchy areas, bad weather, steep exposure, etc. During these times, we all tend to focus on the climbing at hand, and neglect the camera. This is natural.

But when you look back, you realize you have no photos of what, in retrospect, was the best part of the trip. Stay vigilant, and try to remember to keep the camera handy, and use it, when your natural inclination is exactly the opposite. You'll find some pretty cool photos come out of it.


This is why I started carrying a nicer point and shoot in my pocket. This way its possible to grab action shots on the fly, and then when I need to set up a shot, and take out my DSLR I stop and pull it out of my pack. Its just way too cumbersome to have that bugger hanging around my neck while trying to climb. :)
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby IronSkiMountaineer » Tue Jul 09, 2013 9:17 am

I mount a GoPro on my trekking pole or my helmet for those on the fly shots when I don't want to/can't pull out my dslr.
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Steve Climber
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby Steve Climber » Tue Jul 09, 2013 9:28 am

forbins_mtn wrote:I'll make sure to snap those photos as soon as I feel the sensation of the dreaded "nervous pee"...that's when i know the best photo will be taken


Just make sure you aim the camera above waist line :P
Dave B wrote:And/or line thy helmet with tin foil and realize this is a freaking mountaineering website.


Steve Climber wrote:So that's your backpack, huh?
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby nyker » Tue Jul 09, 2013 10:52 am

I struggle with this all the time. I carry my heavier DSLR, but not around my neck for obvious comfort and safety reasons. There are tons of shots I wish I had gotten, but didn't or couldn't go through the process at that moment of removing my pack, digging it out, putting it back on, etc:
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby Dancesatmoonrise » Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:45 am

nyker wrote:I struggle with this all the time. I carry my heavier DSLR, but not around my neck for obvious comfort and safety reasons. There are tons of shots I wish I had gotten, but didn't or couldn't go through the process at that moment of removing my pack, digging it out, putting it back on, etc:

I often ask myself the question, what attributes of a DSLR are important (in mountaineering photography) that I can't get with a compact camera?

Firing off multiple shots quickly is great for action. We sometimes see such spontaneous action (wildlife, etc.) in mountaineering, but usually this attribute is not critical. Too, the low-light capability of compacts has really caught up dramatically to the SLR. Sometimes you want to get that gorgeous bokeh that only comes with fast glass on an SLR. (or maybe nowadays on a mirrorless cam?)

So I've gone pretty much exclusively to the compact, and haven't missed the SLR much. The one exception is rock climbing shots of subjects, shot from nearby on the wall, where I want that bokeh to highlight the climbing subject. Can't get that with the compacts I currently own. It can be shopped in, but it's difficult to get it to look as good as what a nice wide-aperture lens can capture. Other than this, the compact rules. It parks in my left hipbelt pocket, or in my right cargo pantleg pocket (when rock climbing,) always ready for action. I only have to remember to pull it out. :roll: :lol:
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Re: Photographing your climbs

Postby Mark A Steiner » Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:50 am

Before digital cameras had good quality, I carried my ancient, heavy 35 mm SLR (with separate 75-300 mm zoom lens) up a few peaks in the mid '90's and got the shots of a lifetime. Now, almost 20 years later, I don't hike as high and less frequently, but the DSLR comes out of the pack to shoot at what I can, knowing full well there is no guarantee I will return again to record similar scenes.
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